Tag Archives: feed your brain

The Next Big Thing

24 Oct

Here’s some of the plot to the Chess Book which has taken over one of the walls in my writing closet.

Hey kids! I got tagged in a blog hop. My first ever! Woot!

Renata Barcelos tagged me in the Next Big Thing which is a chance for writers to talk about what they’re working on next. I’ve got two in the pot right now, the second book in the Lizzy Speare series which I’m calling Lizzy Speare and the Hall of Hecate (maybe) and the book I talk about below. Ready? Allons-y! (that’s French for “Let’s go” for those of you who don’t watch Doctor Who…or speak French.)

What is the working title of your book?

The Chess Book or the Kings Game or Gambit’s Defense or Perpetual Check. I really can’t decide. At this point I just refer to it as the Chess Book.

Where did the idea come from for the book?

I was home in my apartment in Brooklyn one day and someone slipped a menu under the door. I looked up just in time to see it slide across the floor and for a split second I thought “what if it was an invitation” and then “what if it was an invitation for someone else and not me” and it sort of spiraled from there. Funny thing, that moment doesn’t even happen in the book. Inspiration is a strange beast.

What genre does your book fall under?

Young Adult/Science Fiction/Romance/Mystery maybe? I don’t know. The character’s are teens and, to quote The Doctor, some weird “wibbly wobbly timey wimey stuff” goes down.

Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie rendition?

Ha! That’s a good one. I have no idea who would play Kate cause I’m terrible with younger actors but I would pick Evan Peters from American Horror Story for the main male character. In fact, minus the blond hair, he’s VERY Evan Peters, only less, you know, murder-y.

What is the one-sentence synopsis of your book?

Never trust your memory.

Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?

Well if my agent likes it (fingers crossed) it’ll be repped and subbed. If not, I would definitely put it out myself.

How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript?

About 7 months or so. But it’s a looong book (currently at 150K words). Revising has taken close to 2 years but I was also working on other things at the time. Ahem…making excuses’ much?

What other books would you compare this story to within your genre?

Wow. I have no idea. Literally none. Clearly, I broke my first rule about good writing being all about reading.

Who or What inspired you to write this book?

The menu story above. Oh, and my main character is named Kate because of Linda Buckley-Archer’s book Gideon the Cutpurse which really deserves more attention in the States than it gets. It’s a fantastic three book series and one of the main character’s is named Kate. After reading it, I knew I would use that name, just as an homage to such a beautifully written character. She was unforgettable and I guess it’s just my way of saying thanks to Ms. Buckley-Archer. *Sniffle.*

What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest?

Let’s play word association. I’ll say one word and you say whatever comes to mind.

1. Time Travel

2. Chess

3. Stolen Memories

4. New Love

5. Street kids

6. Lies

7. Heartbreak

8. Doppelganger

9. Cockney Accents

10. Underground Resistance Movements

So now…what say you?

I tagged a couple other friends of mine Jen McConnel and Patrice Caldwell so they can play, too. So go check out their answers next Wednesday!

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Word Cloud

20 Sep

Word clouds are cool.

I got this from my good friend Jes via  Word It Out. They make word clouds out of text and Jess did it for her first book – Tab Bennett and the Inbetween – which you can (and should) buy here. Take my word for it, she’s very talented.

So I borrowed her idea and here’s the word cloud for Lizzy Speare the Cursed Tomb.

The words that are used the most often are the biggest. There’s a lot of Lizzy and Jonathan and Sammy. There’s some Cleo but the next book will have even more Cleo. There’s some Shakespeare, some Rupert and some Leonard.

But some of the best parts are the little phrases that pop up:

  • Help Rupert (there’s a major plot point!)
  • Please Muse thing
  • Lizzy’s thought

And my favorite: Shakespeare Everything Something

It’s just a very cool way to look at a story, all puffed up like that.

And finally here’s the word cloud for my favorite chapter in the book. I’ll let you draw your own conclusions about what happens to our “cursed girl.”

Interview with MR Branwen

10 May

So if you aren’t familiar with Slush Pile and you are capable of writing or reading, you should remedy that as soon as humanly possible. It’s a great mag, she’s a great editor and here she gives great advice:

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Why I Rejected Your Submission

A lovely little snippet to whet your appetite:

“If you want to be an excellent writer, you must read a lot, and you must read almost exclusively good writing — preferably writing that has a bit of distance from your own day and age. Because whatever you put into your brain is what will be coming out on the page. What you read affects your vocabulary, your syntax, your internal dialogue. I would go so far as to say it affects the way you interpret the world.”

Slushpile was kind enough to publish one of my story Tentacles not too long ago. They always put out excellent issues and I’m honored to have been included.

Read it. Ingest it. Osmosis it if you have to. Then send her some of your best stuff.

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